Theresa May's Chiefs of Staff Resign After Election Results

British Prime Minister Theresa May vowed to form a government and lead Brexit negotiations after loosing a major snap election Thursday, just 10 days before the government was due to begin Brexit negotiations.

The Conservatives remain the largest party in Britain, but now face the prospect of a hung parliament.

Mr Corbyn said, 'There isn't a parliamentary majority for anybody at the present time, the party that has lost in this election is the Conservative Party, the arguments the Conservative Party put forward in this election have lost.

Predictions of Conservative success became more modest as the party's campaign faltered following a series of missteps. "I would have thought that is enough for her to go, actually". A "soft" Brexit would remove Britain as a member of the European Union, but permit it to remain in the single market.

"It is clear that only the Conservative and Unionist Party has the legitimacy and ability to provide that".

"I don't think the Conservative government is stable, I don't think the Prime Minister is stable".

To pass new legislation, May has turned to the DUP, a small party from Northern Ireland known for pursuing a more socially conservative agenda than the Tories.

The British PM was forced to relinquish her two closest aides - joint chiefs of staff Nick Timothy and Fiona Hill - as she struggled to reassert her authority.

The crisis also increases the chance that Britain will fall out of the European Union in 2019 without a deal.

A delay in forming a government could push back the start of Brexit talks, now scheduled for June 19, and reduce the time available for what are expected to be the most complex negotiations in post-World War Two European history. Surprisingly, Nigel Farage of the United Kingdom Independence Party, which had stridently campaigned for Brexit, on Friday called for a fresh vote on leaving Europe in light of the election result. "We need a government that can act", said Oettinger.

She seems secure for the immediate future, because senior Conservatives don't want to plunge the party into a damaging leadership contest.

"Now, of course, if she's [May] got to be constantly making deals throughout this parliament, or indeed if she falls and there's a lot of negotiations or a lot of discussion as to whether she'll be leading this Conservative minority government". If May is unable to form a majority coalition, or can not set up a minority government, she would nearly certainly be forced to resign. "It is far from guaranteed to vote the deal through".

The shocking election result has caused great embarrassment to Mrs May, who called a snap election in April believing she could wipe out her opposition and gain greater control in the House of Commons.

"It is not the outcome any of us would have wanted in the Conservative Party".

"Theresa May is certainly the strongest leader that we have at the moment", David Jones, a junior Brexit minister, told the BBC.

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