Colorado Cellphone Ban for Children Under 13 Proposed

Ballot language approved for age limits on smartphone sales

Proposed ballot measure would set age limits on smartphone sales

If Initiative 29 does go through, smartphone retailers in the state would have to ask customers if a purchased handset is intended for children under 13.

In Colorado, a cellphone ban could be placed on all children under 13 if one state medical professional is successful on getting his proposed ballot initiative passed. Retailers would also be required to submit monthly reports to the Colorado Department of Revenue.

Retailers who sell a phone for use by a pre-teen would get a warning for the first offense, but may face fines from $500 to $20,000 for continued violations, according to KDVR-TV.

Though Farnum's campaign only targets smartphones-the organization writes on its website that "good, old-fashioned cellular phones with voice, Global Positioning System and, yes, even texting are not included"-kids' usage of mobile devices in general are on the rise".

"Eventually kids are going to get phones and join the world, and I think we all know that, but little children, there's just no good that comes from that", he told The Coloradoan. "I know there have been different proposals out there regarding the internet and putting filters on websites that might put kids at risk". They want to spend all their time in their room.

You tell us: At what age is it appropriate for a kid to have a smartphone?

"Frankly, I think it should remain a family matter, ".

Farnum, the father of five children ages 19 to 11, views children constantly on smartphones as addiction to an electric pacifier.

Be Civil - It's OK to have a difference in opinion but there's no need to be a jerk.

Farnum's proposal is still a long ways off from becoming reality. The research stated that rather than focusing on coping mechanisms and problem-solving skills, which comes from socializing, the children spent most of their time on the device, notes TechTimes.

"It seems to me like it needs to be more of a cultural conversation that's more nuanced than that", Suzanne Null, an associate professor at Fort Lewis College, told the Herald.

The American Academy of Pediatrics' recent guidelines states that children aged 2 to 5 should have their screen use limited to 1 hour per day of high-quality programs.

For children 6 and older: Have consistent time limits on screen time and make sure that it isn't taking time away from sleep or physical activity.

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