Senate health-care bill faces serious resistance from GOP moderates

A container carrying the giant panda Jiao Qing is unloaded from a cargo plane

A container carrying the giant panda Jiao Qing is unloaded from a cargo plane

On Friday, Heller also came out and said he will vote "no" on the bill as it now stands. He said it only benefits millionaires.

But that ended Thursday after Senate Republicans unveiled their health care bill.

About 20 percent of all Americans and 40 percent of America's kids get their health care through the federal government's Medicaid program. "All her medication is covered through Medicaid".

"What I find so disappointing is these bills aren't going to fix the problem", Johnston said Sunday.

Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell smiles as he leaves the chamber after announcing the release of the Republicans' health care bill. She said there's still a need for some sort of rule created to push healthy people to buy insurance, to replace Obamacare's individual mandate -which would be eliminated under the Senate proposal.

Barrasso also disagreed with the argument by Durbin and other Democrats that the GOP is trying to dismantle Medicaid to use the money for tax breaks. That would focus the aid more on people with lower incomes than the House legislation, which bases its subsidies on age. They plan to rush it to a vote with no hearings for their fellow senators or the public. They want to get some points. However, "as now drafted, this bill does not do almost enough to lower premiums".

In a joint statement, the four senators said, "Currently, for a variety of reasons, we are not ready to vote for this bill, but we are open to negotiation and obtaining more information before it is brought to the floor".

Even President Trump - who is single-mindedly obsessed with repealing Obamacare - said that the new bill should be less "mean" than the AHCA. Adults 50 to 65, who don't get health insurance from their employer, will likely face higher premiums. They oppose the bill, but only on paper. Controversial, because it defunds Planned Parenthood for a year and could also gut programs to treat opioid addiction - a cause championed by Gov. Chris Christie.

"They have helped me a whole lot".

"They fight each other", the U.S. leader continued. We're going to end up right back on the street. "Make sure we're taken care of here in the state of Nevada", Heller said. So it is possible that Mr. McConnell views the potential failure of a hastily written health care bill as an eventual boon.

Already five Republican senators have said they can not vote for their party's plan as it stands now, with four them saying it does not go far enough to curb provisions under the Obama law and one saying the cuts in healthcare payments for the poor go too far.

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