What Trump, Mattis and Tillerson are saying amid nuclear threat — North Korea

President Donald Trump is in a bit of a tiff with North Korea right now.   REUTERS  Carlos Barria

President Donald Trump is in a bit of a tiff with North Korea right now. REUTERS Carlos Barria

The threat was prompted by a statement from President Trump, in which he said that any threat to the US would be met with "fire and fury".

"While our State Department is making every effort to resolve this global threat through diplomatic means, it must be noted that the combined allied militaries now possess the most precise, rehearsed, and robust defensive and offensive capabilities on Earth", Mattis said.

President Trump said the country would face "fire and fury" like it had never seen before and North Korea threatened a missile strike against Guam. Trump said in another tweet. "When a President of the United States begins to sound exactly like the Supreme Leader of North Korea, one of them has been brought very low", tweeted The Wire creator David Simon.

Last month, Pyongyang carried out its first two successful ICBM launches, the first showing it could reach Alaska, and the second extending its range even further, with some experts suggesting New York could be vulnerable.

The White House sought to provide more context to the president's Tuesday statement at his New Jersey golf club, where he had convened a meeting on the opioid epidemic during his 17-day vacation.

"Thankfully, faced with the greatest challenge of his presidency, Donald Trump stepped up and in a moment of pure statesmanship, deescalated the rhetoric and brought calm to our worried nation". He appears to be betting that an apparent step toward a shooting war with a nuclear-armed nation will force the other side to back off.

The United States and South Korea remain technically still at war with North Korea after the 1950-53 Korean conflict ended with a truce, not a peace treaty. "All it's going to do is bring us closer to a serious confrontation".

On Tuesday, Guam residents - who live on American soil but are not allowed to vote for the President - spoke about their fear of an attack.

Park said that any real military action would require much more than "rhetoric", and both sides would have to weigh their intelligence options and the political and economic ramifications.

"And President Trump is not helping the situation with his bombastic comments".

Vice President Mike Pence is scheduled to arrive Thursday and National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster is to come to Bedminster this week as well, she said. "He certainly shouldn't doubt the will of the United State".

So, what exactly did Trump do in this area?

According to Arms Control Association, a peaceful resolution to the escalating crisis is more difficult than ever to achieve.

"I believe it's important that the current language be scaled down, and that the current threat be weakened".

"Literally nothing has happened in the last 201 days to increase the overall power of the US nuclear arsenal", Schwartz wrote on Twitter.

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