Guam residents feel patriotism but worry grows

North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un looks on during the test-fire of inter-continental ballistic missile Hwasong-14 in this undated

Pres. Trump warns of 'fire and fury' if North Korean threats continue against US

On Friday, he tweeted, "Military solutions are now fully in place, locked and loaded, should North Korea act unwisely".

So it's not surprising that Guam's strong military presence has gotten Kim Jong-un's attention.

The possibility of a nuclear confrontation is considered remote but global alarm has been escalating in recent days.

At least Trump's words reflect a desire to do - or at least say - something different after three decades of bipartisan failure on North Korea. But it is also one that the U.S. military has been watching develop for years, with fairly well-defined steps that have led to an ever more complicated and potentially unsafe situation - but not the outbreak of a nuclear war. Such a launch would not do any damage to USA citizens or military assets, but would demonstrate that the island is within range of the Hwasong-12, which Pyongyang claims is capable of delivering a nuclear payload.

The exercises are an annual event, but come as Pyongyang says it is readying a plan to fire off four Hwasong-12 missiles toward the tiny island, which is US territory and major military hub.

"No one, not even the North Koreans, knows the CEP of the HS-12", Mike Elleman, the senior fellow for missile defense at the International Institute for Strategic Studies, told Business Insider, referring to circular error probable, or the distance by which a missile can be expected to miss its target.

KCNA said the plan would presented to Kim by mid-August. She wrote, "North Korea's most recent threat to target Guam is risky and it further heightens tensions in our region".

"While it is extremely unlikely that Pyongyang would risk the assured annihilation of its revered leadership with a pre-emptive attack on USA citizens, some residents of Guam are concerned".

On Thursday, Trump replied to North Korea's threat to hit Guam with a threat of his own.

"Hopefully it'll all work out", Trump said. "And he'll see", he said.

"If bombers attacked us or warships bombarded us, we would fire back", the defense minister said in March, adding that "striking a country lobbing missiles at us is no different". The Japanese Defense Ministry told CNN no PAC-3 batteries were being deployed to those areas.

President Donald Trump is seeking continued help from China's president in addressing the threat posed by North Korea's nuclear developments.

China Central Television on Saturday cited Xi as saying that Beijing and Washington are both interested in the denuclearization of the peninsula. Japan is expected to provide logistical support to American troops and escort USA vessels in the event of military conflict on the Korean Peninsula.

"The DPRK should cease any consideration of actions that would lead to the end of its regime and the destruction of its people", Mattis said in a statement, using the acronym for North Korea's official name, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

He declined to rule out a first strike.

But it's not the same talk of impending crisis you hear from politicians on the USA mainland, a place where Guam is rarely seen on the news.

A member of Trump's Republican Party, Calvo insisted during the two men's call that "I have never felt more safe or so confident with you at the helm", according to his office. "We'll see what happens".

"Sure, we'll always consider negotiations".

Speaking to reporters in California on Thursday, Defense Secretary James Mattis declined to discuss in detail the United States military's readiness.

"For me because I'm a father, so it's really concerning, you know, I wish it didn't have to come to that", he said. "And I'll tell you this, it may be tougher than I said it, not less".

Analysts say that the escalation is unhelpful to resolving the increasingly tense situation in the Pacific. "That decision cycle has nearly collapsed", Lt. Col. Rick Francona, retired CNN military analyst.

"Everyone is going about doing the same routine, but everyone is talking about the threat", Josie Sokala, who lives in the village of Mangilao on the eastern shore of Guam, said in a message. "That's just sometimes how people are - they don't want to show their fear inside". "Our allies are safe".

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