Harvey brings threat of rain on 12th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina

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"It's not an overnight thing", she said. Trump tweeted back. Later, the White House announced Trump would go to Texas on Tuesday. "It was like watching a movie screen". Federal levees and floodwalls crumbled, ushering powerful storm surge into the city and leaving 80 percent of New Orleans underwater for weeks. Now, 12 years later, they've had to evacuate their Houston home in the wake of Hurricane Harvey.

Ironically, Cowen described in his book, "The Inevitable City: The Resurgence of New Orleans and the Future of Urban America", how he and Tulane officials worked to reopen the university from the safety of Houston after Katrina swept through New Orleans on August 29, 2005.

Fothergill noted that many students affected by Hurricane Harvey in the Houston area are also likely to suffer the effects of "cumulative vulnerability" and will have a hard time recovering from the disaster ― the Houston Independent School District alone has more than 210,000 students in 283 schools, and more than half of its students are considered economically disadvantaged.

Never, he said, did he expect Houston to face this kind of disaster.

Yet many believe Houston and surrounding environs may be spared a similar fate.

Others shared photos from Hurricane Katrina with the hashtag #PrayforHouston.

"And I remember doing this", she said drawing her arms together to demonstrate.

And so there has been an outpouring of love from the Bayou State to the Bayou City since Harvey came to town. But a spokeswoman, Rhonda Trow, said the authority chose not to release water from Lake Conroe in advance because the amount it held wouldn't have made a difference and could have caused flooding even before the storm hit.

At least three deaths have been attributed to the storm, but authorities said many more people are missing.

But she felt a sense of importance to share her experience so that people suffering in Houston gain a better understanding of what lies ahead.

"It's a trigger", Moore said.

Like countless families in Houston and other affected areas, Larkins and her family lost a great deal during the 2005 hurricane. Harvey's toll on housing in the much larger Houston metro area may verge on the wreckage left by the earlier storm - but at a time of increasingly severe worker shortages. "There's just not enough people, not enough boats". "It comes at a much, much deeper level". He fled to Houston before Katrina, a trip that took 32 hours.

It was stunning to have things like the reports of tens of thousands of body bags being delivered to New Orleans.

A college friend of hers was rescued in Houston on Monday. The pictures that I've been seeing, how high the water is, like how it's coming underneath bridges and stuff like that, I don't feel like our water got that high.

Although separated by less than 400 miles, Houston and New Orleans are worlds apart.

The federal government - and those in states and cities - which learned from Katrina will also learn from Harvey, he said.

"If all goes well, we won't see catastrophic flooding like in Houston", Ward said. And once it hit, people were able to call emergency services to be rescued. "They are getting help, and they are getting shelter, they are getting food - they are getting love". "They really, really stepped up and they really opened their hearts to us and now it's time to give back". Chief among those lessons was that the worst is yet to come.

For the families who stayed in New Orleans, attending school still posed a challenge. Hurricane Katrina was later seen as "a real black mark on journalism", says Kathleen Bartzen Culver, the assistant professor and James E. Burgess Chair in Journalism Ethics and director of the Center for Journalism Ethics at the University of Wisconsin Madison.

"You bleed for those people, you know?"

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