Number of Rohingya Muslims fleeing violence rises to almost 400000

In Suu Kyi's Silence, Evidence of Growing Absence of Moral Conscience in Politics

Myanmar nationals in Japan protest against UN over Rakhine conflict

About 40 per cent of the total Rohingya population living in the Rakhine State of Myanmar has now fled to Bangladesh, the United Nations has said.

His comments came ahead of a closed-door UN Security Council meeting to discuss the deepening humanitarian crisis.

The militant group behind the September 11, 2001, attacks on the Untied States issued a statement urging Muslims around the world to support their fellow Muslims in Myanmar with aid, weapons and "military support".

"The situation remains, or seems, a textbook example of ethnic cleansing", U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein said.

Meanwhile, Zaw Htay, a spokesman for Myanmar's presidential office, said the reason people abandoned their homes was because many were told to leave by family members who were involved in terrorist activities.

"Europe is in the process of seeing with the Myanmar government and neighbouring countries in what way we can be useful". "We have heard them saying, 'No Rohingya in Myanmar.' But we will go back", Arif said.

Since last month, some 380,000 refugees have fled a security crackdown in Myanmar's mainly Buddhist Rakhine State.

USA ambassador Nikki Haley tweeted that message Wednesday, writing, "We thank Bangladesh for hosting hundreds of thousands of refugees, fleeing violence, with nowhere to go".

On Thursday, a senior lawyer representing India's government told the supreme court that "the state considers that Rohingyas are a threat to national security".

Images purportedly showing atrocities against the Rohingya have flooded Bangladeshi social media, triggering an outpouring of sympathy.

In any case it's not clear how much influence Aung San Suu Kyi, the Nobel peace prize laureate and head of Myanmar's government, can wield over the country's powerful military and public opinion, which is strongly anti-Rohingya.

The council urged "immediate steps" to end the violence taking place, in a unanimous statement, and called for humanitarian aid workers to be able to reach those in need in Rakhine state.

Meanwhile, the European Parliament today demanded the Myanmar military immediately end violence against Rohingya Muslims, adding to worldwide pressure over the crisis.

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