Why is climate change even a debate?

Trump admin doesn't want to talk about climate change - CNNPolitics

COLUMN: Tropical storm Harvey ignites the climate change debate

The results are hurricanes, intense rainfall, heat waves, drought and wild fires.

While the continental US has been fortunate in not having the damaging landfall every year of a major hurricane, that does not imply that in those years in which there was no USA landfall that such storms did not occur.

So what's up with the weather?

Four years later, the USA has experienced two hurricanes and multiple wildfires within the span of a month. Reducing the amount of animal-based foods in our diet is one small step with huge positive consequences, as well as traveling less and reducing and reusing before we even think about recycling (and then recycling as a final option). He literally is the keeper of Earth's weather extremes, recording and verifying (or repudiating) weather extremes as they are reported around the world. Look at the past few months: Not only were several big US cities slammed by monster hurricanes, but San Francisco set a heat record - 106 degrees on September 1, a day when the average high there is 70 degrees; the West was choked by record-breaking forest fires exacerbated by drought; and South Asia was slammed by extraordinarily harsh monsoons, killing 1,400 people. Setting aside the fact that those wind velocities tie it for second fastest sustained winds in history, the duration of those speeds makes Irma the strongest Atlantic hurricane on record, according to Feltgen. The damage toll from Harvey may have set a new all-time-high - if it isn't bested by Irma's destruction. However, there have been two previous Category 5 hurricanes that were Category 5 at the time they made landfall in Florida: The 1935 Florida Keys "Labor Day" hurricane, and Hurricane Andrew, which hit Dade County, Florida, on August 24, 1992. In other words, it did not completely spare America, though the eye did not make landfall. "The issue this year is that these storms have impacted the US directly".

Offering any statement that is anything other than complete agreement with the extreme position of climate change crusaders will get you labeled a denier or worse.

We can't undo Harvey, but we can work together to lessen the likelihood that we have to suffer through anything like it for at least another 500 years. That was $1.95 billion more than the previous year's third quarter. We also asked a more general question about how much effort people thought should be devoted to planning for the impacts of climate change.

Meanwhile The Heritage Foundation declared the "I told you so" responses from the aforementioned authorities to be a myth. Furthermore, scientists have linked the melting of glaciers in Antarctica to the altered atmospheric circulation at mid-latitudes that caused the storm to pause over Houston.

Q: Might climate change make these storms more severe? Warm upper ocean water provides the most vital hurricane fodder-energy and water. Many other studies have come to the same conclusion. These storms caused a drop in temperature without signs of increase for the following week. Over 65 percent of the people surveyed, for example, supported some level of effort being made to plan for climate change impacts. We can start by using public transportation more often; by making our homes more energy efficient just by adding insulation or changing our light bulbs to LEDs; by helping promote renewable energy; by planting trees; and by putting the three Rs of sustainability into practice: Reduce, reuse and recycle. Warmer warms and more evaporation put more moisture into the atmosphere, so increased precipitation can occur.

This phenomenon creates an upward wind due to lower pressure at the surface and higher pressure above. That lack of movement allowed for continued rainfall over many days - and that lead to massive flooding.

To their credit, Newsweek has also run pieces discussing the link between climate change and stronger storms, but their decision to run this Cato piece is dangerously irresponsible, especially at this moment in time. Climate is "long-term", while meteorology is "short-term".

Now that Hurricane Irma has left the state of Florida, I would like to ask our elected officials, "Now can we talk about climate change and sea level rise?"

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