Graham-Cassidy Health Care Hearing Starts With Eruption Of Protests

Republican Press Conference after Weekly Party Luncheon

Washington state would lose $10B through 2026 with latest Obamacare repeal plan, study says

If you read the updated bill, which was leaked Sunday night to The Washington Post and other news outlets, it's pretty clear which senators Cassidy and Graham are playing to.

There's little evidence it will work.

The president once again belittled the senator with one more tweet several hours later: "The Democrats are having a laugh while they state that McCain had a 'value moment.' Tell the folks of Arizona that they were scammed, a 116% increase!" He was one of five U.S. Senators targeted in a new ad from a health-care consumer organization opposed to the latest Republican health care bill. The condition causes strokelike seizures, speech loss and motion loss in the right side of her body, Williams said. He said Sunday that he might consider an ACA repeal bill that both constricts the block grants as outlined in the original version of Graham Cassidy, waives numerous federal regulations for insurance plans, according to The Washington Post.

The word "shall" is stronger than the words "intends to", so a casual reader of the bill might come away with the impression that the revised bill has stronger protections for people with preexisting conditions than the previous draft. "I won't be bribed or bullied".

And it shows the GOP in Congress and the White House treating Californians not as Americans, but as Californians. The bill's sponsors as well as the President, are determined to find the votes after months of repeal efforts, and time is nearly up. Republican leaders have only until the end of this month to pass the bill in the Senate using procedures that shield it from a Democratic filibuster.

Sen. Patty Murray was leading bipartisan talks aimed at improving Obamacare, but those were scuttled this week as Republicans made their latest effort at repeal. And the GOP estimates also assume that states would slash their own funding for coverage and then factor that into the final number as "state savings".

The prospects for bringing the bill to the floor next week, however, are dimming. Republican Senators John McCain and Rand Paul already have registered their opposition. He cited concerns with the Republican's partisan process and their lack of hearings, markups and amendments in the Senate.

The Graham-Cassidy proposal would end the Affordable Care Act's subsidies for private insurance and end the Medicaid expansion for low-income Americans adopted by 31 states, including MI.

The bill would eliminate the requirement that most Americans obtain health insurance or pay a penalty. Several Republican senators spoke out against the plan, including Senator Susan Collins of ME, who said safeguards for americans need to be stronger.

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, Alaska Republican, is another key holdout who will be tough to get to "yes".

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