McDonnell insists Labour is not ignoring Brexit despite row over conference debate

The London mayor’s office intervened after he was absent from the timetable for addressing delegates

The London mayor’s office intervened after he was absent from the timetable for addressing delegatesJOHN PHILLIPS GETTY IMAGES

Britain's revitalised opposition Labour Party kicked off its annual conference yesterday with leader Jeremy Corbyn set to lay out his party's agenda on Wednesday.

"It was you and Labour members that forced the shift in Labour's frontbench position in August, the small but significant shift that it was and it will be you and Labour members that force a further shift and stop a chaotic hard Brexit and as far as some of us are concerned, hopefully stop Brexit altogether". "Many members will be shocked at maneuvering to avoid biggest issue of our time".

"We haven't seen any real progress in negotiations since they began. I also believe that Labour needs to show to the country that we are in tune with their concerns".

This eagerness to get on with it was shared by several Corbyn supporters who took to the stage in Brighton. "We only win power when we're able to bring those groups back together and speak for both".

Telles compared stopping Brexit to the Monty Python "dead parrot" sketch, and in a reference to the Labour leader's love of Arsenal, said: "You have as much chance of stopping Brexit as Jeremy Corbyn has of wearing my Tottenham shirt".

Sussex university student Kirsty told Socialist Worker, "We heard about this rally twenty minutes ago and ran to get here". Though cowards flinch and traitors sneer, we'll keep the Corbyn flag flying here'. She said that Labour made their politics legitimate.

"I'm so excited for this conference".

"But what I want to see is a sensible approach because if we end up cutting off our noses to spite our faces, it's the NHS and social care that will be damaged as a effect".

"I think he proved me and others wrong with what he did at the election". I was out canvassing in all weathers.

Second to take to the podium was Amal Bidair, a young Muslim activist originally from Eritrea who was involved in helping people after the fire at Grenfell Tower.

Steve said, "Jeremy has been unbelievable since the general election-his speeches, his presence".

"Work doesn't stop for me and I'll be extremely exhausted when it's all finished".

"I've lost 16 colleagues this year".

And Annie said, "There's a wind of change. The blame game and the name-calling and abuse that is being hurled around is really, really unhelpful", she said.

The Labour MP explained that despite her party's surprise performance in June - which she described as a "total shock" - it is still is suffering from a long-standing disconnect with voters in Brexit-voting, largely working-class towns, like her constituency Wigan, northwest England. Numerous meetings had queues stretching down the street to get in.

It also serves as yet another indicator of the trouble for the Labour party in reconciling such views with those who want to implement the result from the referendum.

Others talked about the ongoing battle against the right.

Speaking times would be "severely restricted" this year, he told the.

"The Tories and the right think they are the only people who are fit to govern and they're shit scared of what's going on".

When talking about homeless people in many of Britain's cities, he said: "They are not the cause of this housing problem, they are the symptom".

Addressing the Labour women's conference on Saturday, Corbyn said giving the grassroots a greater role would give him the power to replace Prime Minister Theresa May and ultimately change the "system of inequality and injustice" in the British society.

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