Republican leaders: Senate won't vote on Obamacare repeal

Swing states like Ohio would lose funding under health bill

LETTER: Reject Cassidy-Graham bill

NPR and the New York Times have both confirmed the death of Graham-Cassidy, GOP's latest health care bill that would've seriously screwed over states like OR, due to opposition within the GOP on the part of Sens.

Graham and Cassidy tried to get the repeal legislation passed under the Senate's budget reconciliation rules, which expire at the end of the fiscal year, on September 30. They can lose only two votes from their party and still pass legislation with the help of a tie-breaking vote from Vice President Mike Pence, the Post reported.

Democrats in the Senate, who have opposed the GOP's health care proposals this year, rejoiced. McConnell, according to one senior GOP aide, gave Graham his commitment that there would be another chance to push for the bill after the chamber completes its work on tax reform, the next major agenda item for Republicans.

The Kentucky Republican spoke as he tries to decide whether to hold a vote on the latest GOP bill repealing President Barack Obama's law.

"Health care is a deeply personal, complex issue that affects every single one of us and one-sixth of the American economy", Collins said Monday in a statement.

The failure in the Senate was also a disappointment to Republicans in the House, who managed to pass a repeal bill in May after their own struggles. In May, he voted for the House version of rolling back the Affordable Care Act - Obamacare.

"Look, we haven't given up on changing the American healthcare system".

On Monday, Republican Sen. Bill Cassidy of Louisiana and South Carolina's Lindsey Graham. But he did run on a campaign promise to destroy Obamacare without knowing anything about health care. "We haven't given up on that", McConnell said Tuesday afternoon. Susan Collins (R-ME) joined John McCain (R-AZ) and Rand Paul (R-KY) this week in publicly rejecting the Republican party's newest attempt at repealing the ACA.

Graham said the bill would have passed had there been more time to consider it.

Trump says he's "very disappointed by a couple of senators", adding, "We don't know why they did it". But Schumer called for unity among Democrats and other advocates of universal health care. "There is no doubt about their commitment to repeal and replace Obamacare and no doubt about their support of local control", they continued. She became the third Republican to announce a no vote, joining Sens.

But even with the presidential pressure and with a majority in the Senate, Republicans couldn't agree on any approach.

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