Apple hit with lawsuit for deliberately slowing down older models of iPhone

Apple hit with lawsuit for deliberately slowing down older models of iPhone

Apple hit with lawsuit for deliberately slowing down older models of iPhone

"Apple's decision to purposefully. throttle down these devices", it says, "was undertaken to fraudulently induce consumers to purchase the latest" iPhone.

If Apple is going to drop the performance of a smartphone because of poor battery life, it should replace an iPhone's battery at no charge.

The feature was confirmed after an iPhone 6s user posted images of a performance test to web forum Reddit, which showed an increase in their phone's benchmark performance score after the battery had been replaced.

Apple rubbished those claims, and stressed that their only goal is to enhance the customers experience. The company says as iPhone batteries age, or in certain conditions such as cold weather, the devices can struggle with demands for more power.

It said it released the fix for iPhone 6, iPhone 6s and iPhone SE and later extended it to iPhone 7. Apple uses some of the most powerful processors around which makes things even more complicated.

iOS updates are installed in over 70% of devices within the first couple of months of availability.

Apple hit with lawsuit for deliberately slowing down older models of iPhone
Apple hit with lawsuit for deliberately slowing down older models of iPhone

Ala Abdulla and Lance Raphael, both of Illinois; Sam Mangano, of Ohio; Ryan Glaze, of IN; and Kirk Pedelty, of North Carolina, all said they purchased new iPhones after earlier models grew sluggish.

Consumers seem to believe that Apple's motives were less than honest.

I do agree that more transparency could have helped users feel less blindsided.

If Apple openly spoke about this "feature" there would have been no controversy, and conspiracy theorists wouldn't have had the field day they are having right now. It would also ensure that the iPhone retained its all-day battery life. Apple also did not disclose to its user base that with such software updates, their phones would end up slowing, adding more frustration. If this is indeed a power management feature Apple should have also considered asking users before activating it.

Apple addressed the issue in November, announcing a free battery-replacement program for "unexpected shutdown issues".

The result may have been that people who became frustrated with a slow iPhone might have spent hundreds of dollars on an upgrade that they didn't really need - as opposed to simply buying a new battery, which costs $79. Such option is not as easy as it sounds. Just take it into a shop and have the battery replaced.

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