Facebook plans to allow all users to 'unsend' their private messages

Facebook's new policy Advertisers pushing political issues must verify their identities

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is scheduled to face Congress on April 10 and 11

The move to authorise issue-based ads comes on top of the changes Facebook rolled out in October, when it said advertisers running federal-election-related ads in the U.S. would be required to verify their identities and include disclosures.

Another issue facing Facebook may be keeping its advertisers happy.

Now, the company says, that process will be rolled out worldwide - and also extended from covering exclusively political ads to the fuzzier category of "issue" advertising.

Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg told NBC that Facebook users could have to pay to completely opt-out of their data being used to target them with advertisements.

But now, the company said Friday, people who run pages with "large numbers of followers" will need to be verified.

Facebook, Twitter and Google said they discovered scores of ads and phony accounts linked to Russian Federation, some of which explicitly mentioned the election.

Just a month ago, controversy erupted when Facebook first acknowledged that London-based data analytics firm, Cambridge Analytica harvested the personal information of tens of millions of its users which resulted in its suspension from the platform.

The company is trying to clamp down on fake pages and accounts used to disrupt the 2016 USA presidential election. It says examples could include pro-life or pro-choice ads, ads relating to the Second Amendment ads, and ads on issues like public infrastructure.

Zuckerberg is expected to appear before United States politicians on Tuesday to explain Facebook's mishandling of user data in the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

CubeYou has been hit with an allegation that the firm sold collected data from researchers who worked with the Psychometric Lab at Cambridge University.

"Election interference is a problem that's bigger than any one platform, and that's why we support the Honest Ads Act", Zuckerberg wrote in a Facebook post on Friday.

Cubeyou's website says it offers marketers "all the best consumer data sources in one place", including information gathered from social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter.

Facebook suspended Canadian political consultancy AggregateIQ over alleged improper access to user data and presumed ties to Cambridge Analytica.

The firm used the information, without users' consent, to support the campaign for Britain's exit from the European Union, as well as the 2016 election campaign of US President Donald Trump. "Next to it we will show "paid for by" information", to let users know the source of the message.

Facebook will be giving up the primary data source that is used by businesses in targeting users for relevant ads.

Yup, I'm guilty of the next item: dictating who will see what I post to Facebook.

Facebook's move to suspended data analytic firms comes after its massive privacy scandal which exposed almost 87 million users.

People living in totalitarian countries where dissent can be unsafe, for instance, or workers in the USA who want to organize around a cause that their employer doesn't support, might be less inclined to use Facebook to do so if they know they have to reveal their identity to someone, even if it is just Facebook.

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