Photos of the night 105 missiles lit up Syria

After chemical weapons attack, Trump quickly changed tune on Syria

Britain had no choice but to conduct air strikes, Theresa May says

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, joined by Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Joseph Dunford, speaks at the Pentagon, Friday, April 13, 2018, on the USA military response, along with France and Britain, in response to Syria's chemical weapon attack on April 7.

Pence told Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on the sidelines of a summit in Peru on Saturday that President Donald Trump "made it clear to the world" that the United States "will not tolerate these chemical weapons".

After the announcement, the U.S. said strikes had been launched at 9pm EST (2am BST) and had destroyed important infrastructure at three sites connected with the Syrian regime's chemical weapons programme.

A draft United Nations Security Council resolution by Russian Federation, seen by Reuters, hoped to condemn "the aggression against the Syrian Arab Republic by the U.S. and its allies in violation of global law and the UN Charter".

He said the targets selected by US, British and French officials were meant to minimize civilian casualties.

It is the biggest intervention by Western powers against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. It fulfilled Trump's vow that chemical weapons are a "red line" that he, unlike his predecessor Barack Obama, would not allow Assad to cross.

The statement concluded that the United States, which it said has amassed the most chemical weapons of any country, has "no moral right to blame other countries".

Russian Ambassador Anatoly Antonov warned that there will be consequences for the US-led military strikes on Syria, adding that it was unacceptable to insult Russian President Vladimir Putin. But the airfield targeted by the Pentagon resumed operations shortly after the attack and, according to Western intelligence assessments, chemical attacks resumed. Russia said none of the more than 100 cruise missiles fired early on Saturday entered airspace covered by Russian air defense systems, easing worries of an escalation into wider conflict.

"I urge all member states to show restraint in these risky circumstances and to avoid any acts that could escalate matters and worsen the suffering of the Syrian people", he said.

"Thank God this was less than we had feared". She described being jolted awake by explosions and the sound of jets roaring overhead.

"As other nations step up their contributions, we look forward to the day when we can bring our warriors home", Trump said.

"Clearly the Assad regime did not get the message past year".

Crowds gathered in central Damascus expressed defiance, waving portraits of Assad and mocking Trump.

The longer the Trump administration goes without a justification for what we're doing, there's a grave potential for ineffectual use of military force.

But McKenzie said at a Saturday briefing that Syrian air defense shot 40 missiles, mostly after the attack, and that it did not successfully engage any of the allies' aircraft or missiles.

Pentagon officials said the attacks targeted the heart of Assad's programs to develop and produce chemical weapons.

U.S. Secretary of Defence Gen. James Mattis said U.S. and its allies struck harder this time than the 2017 strike against the country which did not seem to deter the Bashar al-Assad's regime.

Syria's foreign ministry denounced the strikes as a "brutal, barbaric aggression" and suggested they were aimed at "hindering" the work of inspectors from the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons due to start in Damascus yesterday.

"Let them do what they want, kill who they want..."

In London, May said the West had tried "every possible" diplomatic means to stop Assad from using chemical weapons.

They seemed unlikely to have much impact on the balance of power in Syria's seven-year-old civil war, in which Assad's government has steadily gained the upper hand against armed opponents since Russian Federation intervened in 2015.

The Washington Post's Anton Troianovski in Moscow, Suzan Haidamous in Beirut and Zakaria Zakaria in Istanbul contributed reporting.

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