How the Hill Reacted to the Trump-Kim Summit

This image depicts phone talks between South Korean Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha and U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo

This image depicts phone talks between South Korean Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha and U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo

In reporting on Monday's summit in Singapore, the Washington Post noted that President Trump did not approach Kim Jong Un as a pariah, but showered him with respect.

President Donald Trump said he trusts Kim Jong Un and that he has received the same trust in return following a historic sit-down with the North Korean leader.

Kim emerged from the summit having scored several victories. Kim twice meet Moon and also made two trips to China to meet with Chinese President Xi Jinping.

Despite the US president's enthusiasm, the agreement signed by Trump and Kim contains no specific example of how the two sides will achieve the stated aim of "complete denuclearization".

"We have right now 32,000 soldiers in South Korea". There was not even a pledge that either side "shall" take action; just the assertion that North Korea will "commit to working towards" denuclearisation, which it sees as a general, not unilateral, process.

Trump's scorecard is far more mixed.

It was a firm handshake of equals pressed upon each other, but one that was significantly shorter than Mr Trump is used to, lasting only seconds instead of the uncomfortably long ones the U.S. leader usually gives.

Mr Kim's itinerary was reported in detail, which is a rarity for the state's media, according to South Korea's Yonhap news agency. Because of North Korea's variable seasons, which include cold and dry winters, Davis said the group hopes the recovery effort will yield full skeletal remains with identification cards still attached to uniforms.

Now a top analyst with United States Institute of Peace, Mr. Yun told CNN on Tuesday that halting joint U.S. By signing onto the joint statement that reaffirms North Korea's commitment to the "denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula", Trump may have signed up to a deal that could limit the US military's ability to operate in Northeast Asia.

Granted, the US concessions are mostly reversible.

Kim also proved to be a secret night owl, stunning onlookers in Singapore by going on an unannounced night-time prowl of the city sights, accompanied by a horde of aides and security officers.

It also seemed to leave officials completely off guard in South Korea, where the presence of USA troops has always been described as necessary to maintaining peace on the peninsula. "Our forces in South Korea are stabilizing for Asia". Trump defended his decision by emphasizing the high cost of joint military exercises. "And they're not ready if they can not exercises". North Korea is seeking a security guarantee - possibly including a peace treaty formally ending the Korean War - and the removal of the U.S.'s nuclear umbrella protecting allies South Korea and Japan. Before the announcement, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo seemed to hint that the outcome of the talks might not be what Trump has promised in the past.

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